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Strategies for a Secure World: Interviews with Brian Michael Jenkins: part2

Two interviews on terrorism were conducted by Xandra Kayden (member of the LWVUS Board from 2001 to 2008) with Brian Michael Jenkins in Los Angeles in August of 2008.  They are part of the “Strategies for a Secure World” program that encouraged Leagues to educate themselves and their communities about why we are under attack, how terrorism has changed, and to begin thinking about what kinds of policies will be required to defeat terrorism in the long-run.

Strategies for a Secure World: Interviews with Brian Michael Jenkins: part1

Two interviews on terrorism were conducted by Xandra Kayden (member of the LWVUS Board from 2001 to 2008) with Brian Michael Jenkins in Los Angeles in August of 2008.  They are part of the “Strategies for a Secure World” program that encouraged Leagues to educate themselves and their communities about why we are under attack, how terrorism has changed, and to begin thinking about what kinds of policies will be required to defeat terrorism in the long-run.

Other Players in the Game: Who Makes a Difference --- For Better or Worse?

The second panel of "An Era of Polarized Politics -- and Does it Matter?" Introduction by Mary G. Wilson, President of the LWVUS. Panelists include Terence Smith, Former Media Correspondent, The News Hour, PBS and Allison Fine, Author and Senior Associate, DEMOS.

Nine Sundays - Expanding the Political Discourse

Luncheon address from "An Era of Polarized Politics -- and Does it Matter?" Panelists include Mary Wilson, President, LWV and Marvin Kalb, Senior Fellow, Shorenstein Center, JFK School, Harvard University.

How Divided Have We Been and Where Can We Go from Here?

Third panel of "An Era of Polarized Politics -- and Does it Matter?" Panelists include Nancy Tate, Executive Director, LWV; Dr. Pietro Nivola, Vice President, Brookings Institution, Director of Governance Studies Program, and editor of“Red & Blue Nation”; Dr. William Galston, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution and Ron Brownstein, Political Director, Atlantic Media, and author of “The Second Civil War.” Closing comments by Mary Wilson, President, LWV.

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Local Voices on Liberty and Security

by Kelly McFarland Stratman and Nancy E. Tate
The League of Women Voters Education Fund launched its multi-tier project, Local Voices: Citizen Conversations on Civil Liberties and Secure Communities, in February 2005. The project combined one of the League’s strongest traditions—convening community dialogues—with established methods of public opinion research. A complete report of the project’s findings and the League’s recommendations for action was released on September 7. Citizen desire for a transparent and open government is among the project’s important findings. The League’s recommendations in a nutshell: When it comes to the critically important relationship between our civil liberties and our nation’s security, government openness and public involvement are not just desirable—they are essential.

LWV in Action: Protecting Civil Liberties

by Shirley Tabata Ponomareff
In 1942, national League President Marguerite Wells cautioned that in times of crisis such as war, “the citizen loses sight of government and what government is doing, who is doing it, how it is being done.” She summed up the League’s objective in that wartime period: the support of democracy. Today, as our country wages a war against terrorism, the League continues in this proud tradition. From the time that the USA PATRIOT Act became law in 2001, the League has actively lobbied in support of legislation that would limit some of the law’s extreme provisions. At the same time, it has promoted education through panels and workshops as well as its “Local Voices” project.

Transparency, Liberty and Security

In an exclusive interview, Rick Blum, director of OpenTheGovernment.org, answers questions on open access to government, individual liberties and security. He emphasizes the importance of citizens “asking questions, documenting successes and problems, and really pushing aggressively to defend participation and democracy.”